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Murray Edwards College
University of Cambridge

Science at Cambridge: Why I study Science

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    01 Mar

    Science fact

    Elephants rarely get cancer: less than 5% of captive elephants die of cancer, compared to 20% of humans. Elephant genomes have at least 20 copies of the tumour suppressor, p53, which may explain their low cancer rates relative to humans, who have only one copy. 

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    My name is Evelina. I am currently studying Physics and Maths in my second year as part of the Natural Sciences course at Cambridge.

    I have chosen this route as it is one that involves a great deal of critical thinking and that stretches your abilities, keeping you out of comfort zone. There is so much satisfaction when you see yourself developing and acquiring knowledge about the world from a physics perspective.

    The most counterintuitive topic that fascinates most physicists is quantum mechanics. You would have thought that repeating the measurement would reduce the uncertainty. But this is not the case for quantum mechanics.

    After completing a science degree lots of doors are opened, since the skills obtained can be transferred to many jobs. Moreover, you start to think about the objects that surround you from a different perspective.  Why you do not fall thought the chair? What happens to the photons when they encounter the wall? Why is the earth not perfectly spherical? Answers to this can be found only in science.

    Evelina Polyakov
    Undergraduate Student